Tuesday, 27 September 2011

[Press Release] Leicester gets set for a discussion on Zimbabwean Literature


On 8 October 2011, the Leicester Central Library will be the venue for an interactive discussion on Zimbabwean literature.


The session will start at 2.00 pm and finish at 4.00 pm and will see four Zimbabwean writers - Masimba Musodza, Fungisai Sasa, Joyce Chigiya and Tinashe Mushakavanhu - share ideas with the audience on the state of Zimbabwean literature.


The panel is part of the series of events that have been organised for this year’s Everybody’s Reading Festival, an annual, nine-day celebration of books, reading, writing and live performance that aims to get everybody in Leicester reading. Everybody’s Reading starts on 1 October 2011 and runs until 9 October 2011 with events and activities around the city.


Lydia Towsey, one of the organisers of the festival, says, "As part of the discussion on Zimbabwean literature, the audience and panel will explore the social, political and economic situation in Zimbabwe and how the situation affects Zimbabwean writers and literature as well as look at how Zimbabwean writers have been responding to the situation.


“For example, has the political situation in Zimbabwe made Zimbabwean literature overly political? Has Zimbabwean literature ever been anything other than political? Is this a ‘good’ or a ‘bad’ thing? Is writing at home easier or more difficult than writing away from home? Where or what is ‘home’? … The audience and panelists will engage with these and many more questions.”


The writers will share ideas with the audience and read extracts of their own and other writers’ works to illustrate areas of discussion.


“The session will be a rare opportunity for people in Leicester to deepen their awareness and experience great literature and is definitely not to be missed,” Lydia Towsey says.


Notes for Editors:


Masimba Musodza lives in Middlesborough. He writes in both English and Shona. His work includes The Man who turned into a Rastafarian (Diggory Press, 2007), Uriah’s Vengeance (Lion Press Ltd, 2009), A Smell of Paraffin and Other Stories (The Case Files of the Dread Eye Detective Agency) (Kindle Edition, 2011) and Muna Hacha Maive Nei? (Kindle Edition, 2011), a novel which holds the distinction of being the first science-fiction novel in Shona and the first in that language to be published through amazon Kindle. Currently, Masimba Musodza is working on a horror novel that melds his interest in comparative folklore and issues of immigration, identity and belonging. For more information visit http://www.masimbamusodza.co.uk/


Fungisayi Sasa lives in Milton Keynes. She writes in English and is the author of the children’s book, The Search for the Perfect Head(AEG Publishing Group, 2009). She has a short story that has been featured in the anthology, Writing Free (Weaver Press, 2011) while her poems have been featured in places that include the Poetry International website and Spilt Milk Magazine. More information on Fungisayi Sasa is available at http://www.poetryinternational.org/piw_cms/cms/cms_module/index.php?obj_id=16336


Joyce Chigiya is a Zimbabwean school teacher currently studying for an M.A. in English and Creative Writing at Lancaster University. She writes poems and short stories in English. Her work has been featured on the Poetry International website and in the anthology Voices from all over (Oxford University Press, 2006). Five of her poems have also been translated into Chinese for the anthology, No serenity here(Moonchu Foundations, 2010). For more information, visit http://poetryinternational.org/piw_cms/cms/cms_module/index.php?obj_id=9052


Tinashe Mushakavanhu is reading for a PhD in English at the University of Kent. His short stories have been featured in anthologies that include Short Writings From Bulawayo II (amaBooks, 2005); Short Writings From Bulawayo III (amaBooks, 2006); and Writing Now: More stories From Zimbabwe (Weaver Press, 2005). He has also co-edited books that include: A Haunting Touch (Parthian Books, 2007);Remembering Marechera (Ayebia Publishing, forthcoming); State of the Nation: Contemporary Zimbabwean Poetry (The Conversation Paperpress, 2009); and Emerging Perspectives on Chenjerai Hove: Literature, Politics & Culture (Africa World Press, forthcoming). More information on Tinashe Mushakavanhu is available at http://www.kent.ac.uk/english/people/profiles/mushakavanhu.html


Lydia Towsey is one of the organisers of Everybody’s Reading. Her email address is secretagentartist@hotmail.com.


This year Everybody’s Reading takes place between 1st – 9th October, 2011 with events and activities around the city. The festival opens at the brand new Leicester Central Library and New Walk Museum and then continues to spread words across the city from Curve theatre and Kayal restaurant to Phoenix Square cinema and the Crumbling Cookie Cafe. The exciting Finale Weekend ER takes place back at the library, in a four day long extravaganza. Everybody’s Reading is supported by ‘Whatever it Takes’, a pioneering campaign to get primary school children reading in Leicester. The festival is organised in partnership with Leicester Libraries, Charnwood Arts, WORD!, Leicestershire Partnership NHS Trust (LPT) and the Schools Development and Support Agency (SDSA) with the support of Arts Council England. The festival invites participation from people of all ages. For more information, visit http://www.everybodysreading.org/


Leicester is one of the most culturally diverse cities in the United Kingdom. The city hosts a significant number of Zimbabwean nationals.

No comments:

Post a Comment